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Online Relationships: Friend or Foe?

Through the decades of the twentieth century, and heading into the twenty-first century, the way people have approached the realms of romantic relationships have evolved. In the early twentieth century, the main focus for people was finding a marriage partner and starting a family. As the years have passed by, people have become less concerned with marriage, and other things like divorce, interracial relationships, and same-sex relationships have come into play. Along with these factors came one huge entity that seemed to draw everyone together: The Internet.

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Valentine’s Day: What’s the Big Deal?

If you have not already noticed, though it is exceedingly difficult to ignore, Valentine’s Day is coming up. February 14, also known as SAD (Singles Awareness Day), is the miserable day of exchanging tokens of affection. Do you realize that the initials for this dreaded holiday is V.D., which stands for venereal disease? Coincidence? I think not. I am not cynical because I am alone (in fact, I am not alone). I am skeptical because Valentine’s Day shouldn’t “make-up” for the other 364 days of the year. Every day should be a shower of love and appreciation.

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Obama’s Salary Cap – A Step in the Right Direction

Last Wednesday, Barack Obama put a $500,000 salary cap on executives of companies receiving federal bail-out money. The Associated Press described it as “an unusual government intervention in corporate America,” and it is. Normally, corporate America seems to get whatever it wants – at the taxpayer’s expense and with no oversight at all.

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African-Americans at N.C.State Leave Their Mark

The arrival of the month of February means the arrival of Black History Month, when the African-American community and the United States as a whole join together to celebrate the historic achievements of African-Americans. For many at this college it surely leads to the question: What is the history of African-Americans at North Carolina State? About three years ago, the University held a yearlong celebration of the admittance of the first four black undergraduate students at N.C. State. This accomplishment was certainly a big step in the struggle towards equal rights here, but it is only one chapter in a long battle of allowing African-Americans to be educated here.

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Alumni Spotlight: Irene Godinez

Growing up Mexican American in predominantly African-American and Caucasian Durham, NC definitely had its advantages and disadvantages for Irene Godinez. Though her parents emphasized their Mexican American culture, Godinez admits to not be able to completely identify with the idea of growing up in a Hispanic neighborhood. Her first exposure to Hispanics of different nationalities did not occur until her college years when she transferred to N.C. State. From this initial exposure blossomed her desire to form an organization that would not only assist and uplift the Latino community but also establish a network of friends. Some opposition came from the Hispanic community, “You can’t assume there is instant solidarity and instabond just because we share the same language or sometimes culture.” Godinez acknowledges that she was a shy person and forming instant friendships was difficult, however from her announcement at a Mi Familia meeting regarding formation of a Latina sorority stemmed the Rho chapter of Lambda Pi Chi.

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The Complex World of “Love” Shows: Why is it so interesting to see love fail?

Valentine’s Day is traditionally known for the emphasis on those who have that special person to adore and show how much they care. Whether it is by roses, chocolate, flowers, or something even more special and intimate, those in love show each other how they enjoy the feeling. Of course, to get to this point you must find that other half to enjoy it with. For some people, the actual work to find that person isn’t as difficult as those on television make it seem. It’s hilarious and disappointing to see how the concept of “love” has been turned into a carnival act on many VH1 shows.

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2009 Oscar Nominee Highlights

The top actors and actresses will all be gathering together to honor the greatest films of 2008 to early 2009 and all movie fanatics will tune in to see if their favorite films of the year will receive recognition or win in a category at the 81st Annual Academy Awards Sunday, Feb. 22. While there are many movies and categories to name, there were a few films that repeatedly received nominations and media buzz before they were even released; and they smashed the box-office on their opening days. These select few were expected to receive nominations or Oscars way before the nomination list was presented.

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Platanos and Collard Greens: Broadway comes to campus

Platanos & Collard Greens is an Off Broadway hit play that came to Stewart Theatre here on campus. The Union Activities Board Diversity Committee hosted this dynamic event on Tuesday, Feb. 3 and there was a considerable amount of students, staff and faculty, and general public attendees. This romantic comedic play told the story of Freeman, an African-American man, and Angelita, a Latino woman. During this play, both Freeman and Angelita were forced to confront and overcome cultural and racial prejudices. Many of the stereotypical views that individuals have about Latinos and African-Americans were addressed in this play. In defending their bond for family and friendships, Freeman and Angelita both had to go against all the adversity that was thrown their way. Platanos & Collard Greens is a play that should, without a doubt, remind everyone of their own family, their true love, and their life as a whole.

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Recession Proof Your Valentine’s Day

Valentine’s Day is swiftly approaching and with the constant stress of the economic crisis, many couples are wondering exactly what they are going to give their boyfriends or girlfriends this year. Giving gifts is a must in a society where Valentine’s Day is filled with pressure. If one does not give their lover something special then they will most likely be faced with consequences. Of course shopping for females can be relatively easy and not quite expensive with stuffed teddy bears, store-bought flower bouquets and boxed chocolates readily available. Guys, on the other hand are quite difficult to shop for and may be the most expensive for gift giving. With only a few days left to figure out the perfect gift, here are some suggestions for gifts under $30.

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Asia Nite, a Cultural Delight

Lions and tigers and Chinese dragons, oh my! This year’s Asia Nite, a cultural event that showcases skits and performances from Asian organizations on campus and from around the Triangle, featured the theme “Follow the Yellow Brick Road.” Students from UNC, Duke, ECU, and UNC-Charlotte came to partake in the event, which harks the Wizard of Oz. “Even though we’re better in basketball and, well, everything,” boasts UNC student David Chuong, “You guys do have Asia Nite. You [are] all right.”

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Black in Education: Students lack appreciation for Black History Month

Black history month was set aside for African-Americans to celebrate their culture and history, but when I analyze the month, it appears to me to be the most uncelebrated cultural commemoration during the year. Some people may have chosen to not be educated on black history; however, most high schools around America do not teach black history. They may do small things like mention Harriet Tubman, George Washington Carver, and Martin Luther King Jr., but they fail to talk about Malcolm X, Henry P. Newton, or other African-American activists that stood up for what they believed in. Teachers seem to dance around black history, but love to go in depth about how they should be proud to be American. They love to talk about George Washington, Abraham Lincoln (who by the way only freed slaves in the North), and Thomas Jefferson, who wrote the Declaration of Independence, into their lessons. They only educate us as far back as slavery, and do not go back into the history where African-Americans were kings and queens.

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Seeing through the Smoke: Controversy and Campus Organizations

In a world of perfection, unified thought and theory, similar traits and qualities would be embodied by all. People would never have to worry about confrontation and disagreement on world issues like politics and other controversial topics that tend to weigh heavily on the strong beliefs of all parties involved within a debate. At a national perspective such topics rear their heads during the election process, like abortion, and gay marriage. At N.C. State, some of the same issues arise, but not as often as social politics, amongst various groups and organizations. Will they ever be resolved or are we forced to believe that life in the “real world” is much like the itemized version of controversial issues we experience right here at school. This article will serve as part of a series that will reflect upon new or unaddressed issues for the remainder of the semester. I will reflect any reported issue to readers to actively engage students within the University dynamic with issues that matter. I seek to stimulate, involve and interact with readers who have a response and would like to rebut the issue or merely report feedback.

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What About White History Month?

The United States is known as the land of the free. We were established with the words “equality” and “the pursuit of happiness” in mind. Even though these strong words are a part of our doctrine, unfortunately, they do not apply to a large population of people. Today we celebrate the diversity that was not embraced during the times of our Founding Fathers. In the present we not only have black history month, but also Asian Pacific American heritage month, National Hispanic heritage month, and Native American heritage month. While engaging in the history of these cultures, I have come across others asking the question “Why don’t we have a White History Month or White Heritage Day?”

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Miss Kappa Xi Scholarship Pageant: Xi-ceptional women on display

“The Presidential Sweet,” the Miss Kappa Xi Scholarship pageant began around 7:11 p.m. in Witherspoon Cinema Wednesday, Jan. 28. Also known as the Miss Diamond Scholarship pageant, it is an opportunity for young women to introduce their talents to individuals in their own creative way. The five contestants were introduced to the audience with the song “Diva,” by Beyonce, playing loudly in the background. They all came strutting their stuff in stylish black dresses-exemplifying their diva demeanors. The combination of beauty, brains, and personality shined as brightly as a diamond for all of the N.C. State world to gaze and value.

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Marking a milestone: The NAACP commemorates 100 years of fighting for civil rights

A group formerly known as the National Negro Committee opened their first conference in New York City, Feb. 12, 1909. The conference was founded under widespread instances of racial discrimination and hatred that occurred frequently throughout the nation. Among the participants of the conference included some of the organizations founders and also some of the most influential figures in African-American history: William English Walling, Mary White Ovington, W.E.B. DuBois, Ida B. Wells, and Mary Church Terrell. According to a testimonial written by Ovington on the NAACP’s website, the conference recognized the ills of racial discrimination running rampant across the country, even after the Emancipation Proclamation. Its call to order was to recognize the importance of civil, social, and political rights for all.

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President Barack Obama: A Groundbreaking First Seven Days

Now, President Barack Obama’s inauguration was undoubtedly one of the most historical moments in American history, and probably the most significant moment that our generation has seen to date; however, while President Obama’s inauguration holds tremendous historical significance, it is not, by itself, a turning point for this country. It should be understood that that moment alone will not bring change to the people of this country. It is clear that the new president understands this concept: in his speech he promised to go to work, starting on his first full day in office, and make political moves to bring change to the people of this country. From his inaugural address, it was clear that Obama sought to work as a unifier in this time of great need. He made this clear when he addressed all people. In his speech, he mentioned people from all walks of life in America, rich and poor, people of different races and ethnic backgrounds, people of different religions, and even a group that has been long overlooked: the non-believers. With his speech, he gave the people great hope that finally change would be delivered from a president that is clearly concerned with the wellbeing of his nation. In his first full week in office, Obama has been working diligently, and has already done a great job in trying to bring change to the people.

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