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Separate but equal Students are dividing themselves by race

People should take time out to look at the world around us and how divided it is. There are many divisions in the world such as class, race, and gender, but I would like to focus on the main division that has always had America in chaos: race. Think about it, when you walk into the Atrium you see people sitting with their ethnic group. This is something that I call “self-segregation,” because we tend to separate ourselves from others who look different than we do, choosing instead to sit with people who look just like us. It is not such a big deal to most people I guess because it comes so natural, but yet we are not taking advantage of the dream and hope of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and other equal rights activists. I know that we feel more comfortable talking to people who we believe can relate to our situation, but in reality we all have the same problems. Everyone is so much alike the only difference is our skin color and personality. We should not let these differences keep us divided, because deep down we all go through the same problems, such as exams, relationships, schedules, and classes.

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Students should be more proactive

In light of reactive responses to discrimination, lack of resources, and hate speech issues that occur on campus from year to year, people are beginning to wonder whether or not the infrastructure of this campus’ minority population are creating an uproar only after major events take place, rather than prior to its occurrence.

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Black History comes alive Students portray figures in black history at Live Black Wax Museum

This past Saturday, the Society of Afrikan-American Culture hosted the second annual Live Black Wax Museum. Students from the African-American community here at N.C. State portrayed prominent African-American figures that had contributed not only to black society, but also to society as a whole.

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Don’t let Spring Break “break” your pockets, enjoy it while on a budget

Spring break is right around the corner and most students have already booked flights, planned road trips, or scheduled cruises. However, all students are not financially equipped to spend hundreds of dollars on trips to places such as New York, Florida, California and other nice vacation areas. Who would not love to enjoy the bright sunny weather that Florida and California has to offer or the great shopping venues in New York? As we all know, money is not at a surplus and instead of spending your last dime on “keeping up with the Jones’ ” how about plan a few days of fund activities with a group of friends who are also trying to save money by reducing traveling cost for spring break.

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Madea Goes to Jail The newest movie from Tyler Perry debuts

Madea, Madea, Madea.
Coming back with a vengeance is the large and in charge Mabel Simmons in Madea Goes to Jail. This Georgia or “Georgier” peach is from the streets and will not let you sleep on her for a second. You just have to keep your eye on her, the police as well, and should keep your ears open just so you won’t miss that advice that will benefit you in the long run as well. This movie debut on February 20th and is well worth actually going to the theaters to see.

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Never the Sinner is always a winner

It was the “Crime of the Century,” a tale of two intelligent, young millionaires who commit an act of murder as an intellectual test. It begs the question: Can two well-respected members of society literally “get away with murder”? The courtroom drama, penned by John Logan, portrays two cheeky men whom equate the decision to murder with whether or not to eat pie for dessert. Richard Loeb, played by George Kaiser, and Nathan Leopold, played by Russell Gentry, think they are supermen and presume themselves to be above the law. On a 1924 Chicago spring evening, the two decide to kidnap Bobby Franks, a 14-year-old boy, and stow his remains-never to be discovered. However, even the best of supermen can be caught by the slightest mistakes. Never the Sinner tells the story of Loeb and Leopold, despised and swooned by the law and teenage girls, and their motivations behind such a virulent act.

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It Isn’t Just Something You See On TV HIV/AIDS: Establishing itself in our community, now more than ever

Math. Many consider this one of the most sensible and reliable subjects. Since elementary school, we have been conditioned to never question fractions, multiplication, or even the most complex equations that we may not understand. As a writer, there are not too many equations that make sense to me. However, recently I’ve stumbled upon some numbers some of N.C. State’s brightest engineers should find quite disturbing.

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Changing North Carolina For the Better: HK on J3 continues tradition on Jones Street

“Bail out the people, not the banks.” “Don’t balance the budget on the backs of the poor.”
These were some of the many words echoed by approximately 2,000 people in the third annual Historic Thousands on Jones Street march on Feb. 14. Led by the North Carolina State Conference of the NAACP and almost 100 progressive organizations, the movement behind HK on J was made clear to state lawmakers that the 14-point agenda proposed by committee members needed to be addressed. The unique agenda was proposed as a plan of action in order to strengthen living conditions in North Carolina for all residents. “Our agenda is comprehensive because so many people’s pain, problems, and disparities are comprehensive,” said Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II, the president of the North Carolina State Conference of the NAACP. “The cries of the people must be answered today.”

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Task Force holds open forum for students

The Campus Culture Task Force Committee held an open forum discussion in regards to the recent proposal which will be submitted to the Chancellor as suggestions to lower hate speech activity on campus. Student Body President Jay Dawkins led the beginning of the forum by reviewing the 34 page document filled with explicit suggestions by each of the three subcommittees. By breaking the large group into three smaller subcommittees, each was able to focus on a different aspect of what policies student conduct codes and how the campus climate can be altered to better serve the student body. To further address student concerns, Dr. Jose Picart, committee chair, allocated an online response system so students can access the site link and offer suggestions to the proposal, their thoughts about the efforts of campus administration and personal reflections of the event. Students are encouraged to submit examples of ways to improve the current campus climate, plus indicate ways the University can cut down on the number of hate-motivated activity on campus.

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New year, new lecture, new view on healthcare

“Until the lion has his own historian, the tale of the hunt will always glorify the hunter.” This African proverb, so often spoken by Dr. Lawrence M. Clark, Sr., is considered to be accurate by several. It is for this reason the Annual L.M. Clark Lecture is highly respected and anticipated by many.

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Hoops 4 Hope raises awareness and thousands of dollars for breast cancer

People from all backgrounds wearing pink poured into Reynolds Coliseum to attend the fourth annual Hoops 4 Hope, an event that was started by the late Coach Kay Yow to raise awareness for breast cancer On Feb. 15. The atmosphere was not one filled with sadness of the passing of Kay Yow, but one of excitement and celebration: a celebration of a life that had touched many lives at N.C. State and beyond. Breast cancer survivors, students, former players, faculty and many more came out to help make the event one that will go down as one of the most memorable here at N.C. State.

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Controversy in the black community

Many African-American people are skeptical about attending public events with people of the same ethnic group in order to have a good time with friends or family. “Why is this?” you may ask. Well we have all heard the saying, “black people do not know how to act when they get together.” Every time black people get together either at a cook out, a wedding, a funeral, or even in church, something ruthless is bound to happen. Why can’t African-Americans get together and do something positive? We are the only race with which so much controversy resides. Blacks need to stop trying to hold each other back, stop beating each other down, and try to lift each other up. We all know our history and we already know how people tried to keep us down as a race in the past. We need to rise above all negativity and make a change.

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Tunnel incidents bring “obscene” label into spotlight

The First Amendment is widely thought to be perhaps the most important right guaranteed by the United States Constitution. What is and is not covered by the First Amendment has been a key point of debate in deciding how to handle the recent incidents with the Free Expression Tunnel. A right to free speech figures into almost all of the freedoms that Americans enjoy. Whether it is expressing political views, or expressing artistically free speech in the form of music, paintings, or movies, freedom of expression, is an important right. However, not all speech, whether symbolic or spoken, is legally protected. Speech that would possibly and unnecessarily cause harm to others (such as screaming fire in a crowded building when there was in reality no fire) is not protected, child pornography is not protected, and nor is speech that is judged to be ‘obscene.’

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Third Annual Mr. Crimson and Cream Scholarship Pageant

Immaculate, idyllic and inspiring; these are the perfect words to describe the “Men of Honor,” and the participants of the Third Annual Mr. Crimson and Cream Scholarship Pageant, held on Feb. 13. The pageant was hosted by the ladies of the Mu Omicron Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. and held in the Talley Student Center Ballroom. The reception began with a live band providing a smooth, mellow atmosphere, along with beautiful flower arrangements, candles and sweet refreshments. To start off the pageant hosts, Colleen Gillis and Justin Ratliff, both seniors in sociology, introduced the panel of judges and participants.

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African-American Fashion Fair: The African-American Textile Society explores The Evolution of Black Fashion

In honor of Black History month, the African-American Textile Society hosted its first African-American Fashion Fair Feb. 12. The show was an excellent display of just how creative and fashion savvy N.C. State’s textile and fashion students are. The friendly competition was similar to the pageants fraternities and sororities often hold according to Stefan Ashford, a junior in French and fashion textile management. Ashford said the show is pretty much a competition of who is “the flyest in black fashion on campus.” Five contestants were judged by a panel of three AATS members. The focal point and theme of the competition was to demonstrate the evolution of black fashion from the 1800′s until today. Upon entering the Textile Convocation Room one could notice the visual timeline setup in the back of the room. The timeline started in the far right corner of the room with the fashions of post-Civil War America and ended with the fashions of today in the far left corner with a classy, retro feel. The purpose of the timeline was to visually demonstrate the impact African-Americans have had in fashion over the last 200 years.

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Black people wake up, knowledge is power!

As a writer for the Mind Body and Soul section of the Nubian Message, my motive is to encourage the African-American community to engage in research to understand the natural world. These are the reasons why I have written on several topics such as the raw food diet, detoxification of the body, super foods, etc. African-Americans are dying at increasing rates due to complications of high blood pressure, cancer and various other afflictions as compared to their counterparts. According to a pamphlet from Americanheart.org, a Website that provides information on heart disease for minorities, “Blacks are 1.5 times more likely to die from heart disease and 1.8 times more likely to experience a fatal stroke than whites.” It is a duty for the black community to research and find ways to prevent these fatal diseases and help their conditions in order to hopefully prolong the lives of many people. We as a people rely too much on our doctors who sometimes may not have our best interests at hand. I also believe that a portion of African-Americans simply do not care about their health they exemplify apathy in health care because they believe the conditions are hereditary and inevitable. With attitudes like these, no wonder African-Americans are the majority ethnic group stricken with these illnesses. There are some cases of illnesses like cancer, obesity, and heart disease that are genetic and that the possibilities of preventing these diseases that occur later in life are slim to none.

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