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African Americans and Predominately White Colleges

Being a black student in college itself is hard, but most believe that being at a predominately white college or university adds a different element to the equation. But is this really true? A report released to MSNBC by the government said that “more than three times as many black people live in prison cells as in college dorms.” If you take a look around at the average class here on campus, you will find that there are only a handful of black students in each class. There are no colleges or universities that are segregated by racial boundaries; therefore, every individual is allowed to attend the college or university of their choice. So what makes a black person choose to attend a predominately white college or university? When people are looking to attend a certain college or university, the foremost aspect that they should look at is curriculum. After the list institutions have been narrowed down, it is then time to focus on location, size, diversity, distance, cost, and other aspects.

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Behind the lens to center focus: First African American Female Photographer in the White House visits N.C. State

Sharon Farmer, former White House photographer during the eight year Clinton-Gore administration and personal photographer for the Clinton family, gave a lecture on her life experiences from radical college student to artist photography to dynamic lecturer. Jan. 26 at 5 p.m. in Brooks Hall Gallery, an open reception was held for Farmer. During the reception, nearly 30 photographs of Farmer’s work throughout the years were unveiled and opened for public display. The exhibit will remain open and visual from now until Feb. 7. Following the reception, Farmer gave a lecture at Burns Auditorium in Kamphoefner Hall at 6 p.m..The event was free and open to the general public and all those interested in her life journey as a female African-American photographer in the White House.

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The Great Benefits of Tea

When we think of tea, what normally comes to mind? Is it the brand name, Lipton’s? Or is it caffeine? Or is it the use of the warmth of the hot tea in soothing sore throats? I’m sure other ideas related to tea pop into your head too. Many people tend to think of tea as just an alternative to coffee or hot chocolate or even cider; however, it is more than just another hot drink option. There are some qualities about tea that are taken into consideration when dealing with issues surrounding health and wellness.

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Administration takes action: An update concerning the Campus Culture Task Force

A group of 25 students, faculty and staff comprise the Campus Culture Task Force Committee. On Nov. 18, 2008 Chancellor Oblinger formed this committee right after hate speech graffiti was written in The Free Expression Tunnel on Nov. 5, right after President Barack Obama’s victory in the 2008 Presidential Election. After four students wrote racist remarks to express their non-support for President Obama, the administration was forced to take action in mandating new strategies that would protect the University from what some considered threats to the campus environment. After a full federal investigation was completed, officials concluded that these students posed no real threat to President Obama. Although, they were released from federal charges, students were not satisfied with the notion that people could write such hate-filled remarks and not be reprimanded, especially when their target was the new president. After campus leaders and students rallied together to pressure campus administration to answer their luring questions of concern, it was then decided that the incident could not be dealt with overnight. The University mandated a plethora of faculty and students to comprise a committee. The committee is made up of three sub-categories that will all address the questions and concerns of students in regards to the Nov. 5 incident.

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Living the dream through service: Students team up with middle school students for 2009 MLK Service Challenge

A group of Ligon Middle School students eagerly raced to the top of the stairs of the Talley Student Center to participate in the the ninth annual Martin Luther King Service Challenge Saturday. Going on its third year of teamwork, Ligon GT Magnet Middle School and the N.C. State Center for Student Leadership, Ethics and Public Service (CSLEPS) joined forces once again in hopes that the Ligon Middle School students, most who are of minority and come from low income households, would learn the true meaning of teamwork, leadership, and service ethics. Edom Jones, director and overseer of College Prepatory Success (CPS) and Mike Giancola, director and overseer of CSLEPS, joined together once again for their third year, this time on N.C. state campus, with the sole purpose of making sure each middle school participant was given the opportunity to give service back to the community and have exposure to a college environment while honoring the legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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When joking crosses the line

In this day and age, we as a generation have tried to ease the pain of the past from ourselves and others. Sometimes this means poking fun at some of the past events that were looked upon years ago as horrendous. I’ve heard many people making jokes about enslavement and hangings. We also make jokes about each others backgrounds. We call ourselves “nigga” or “wetback” and try to make light of the words. We sometimes try to justify it as endearing or “turning it around” to make it cool. The truth is that that these words came about because of hate. These words were never meant to have a good connotation.

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The Inauguration: A Native Washingtonian’s Perspective

The inauguration of President Barack Obama was bound to be a truly historic event, one that would draw crowds from all over the country and all over the world to witness a truly moving portion of history. However, Todd Farris, a senior majoring in sports management and a resident of the Great Commonwealth of Virginia, and I drove to my home in South East, Washington D.C. anticipating the worst. What you are about to read is not comprised of the patriotic images shown on the news. This is not a candy-coated version that only mentions Obama, his speech, and the historical significance of this day. This is the story of my experience; a Native Washingtonian who watched helplessly as my city ceased to function while being invaded by millions of tourists.

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Has Anyone Used the Term “Snowbama” Yet?

We were told over and over what a historic event we were witnessing, and it just happened to coincide with the first significant snow in Raleigh for five years. I don’t have cable, so every channel carried the inauguration. So, of course I watched on Tuesday as President Obama was sworn into office.

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Transition Program: A Preparation of a Perfect Student

When asked about the Transition Program, many students at N.C State may respond by saying “What is that?” The Transition Program is for students who were not deemed competitive enough for their college by either not having a sufficient SAT score, and/or a low grade point average. According to Danereka Sinclair, freshmen currently in the Transition Program, “It is good for networking, developing study skills, and good work ethic.” The Transition Program is an extension of First Year College Program; however, it has special requirements. The Transition Program requires its students to attend a mandatory study hall, convocations, life coaching sessions, and an academic major’s fair. The study hall, also known as SASI (Supplemental Academic Support Initiative), requires the students to do up to eight hours per week of constructive studying. Even though that seems like a lot to do on top of classes, many students do not mind the commitment and effort that it takes to attend. According to freshman, Taylor MacBain in the program, “SASI is a great academic setting that allows you to stay focused on studying with little or no distractions.” SASI consists of a single proctor in each room that helps the environment stay suitable for studying.

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Obama’s Inauguration is a Milestone, Not a Finish Line

With record numbers in the nation’s capitol, and an excited and hopeful United States looking on, President Barack Obama took the oath of office around midday, January 20, 2009. His inauguration signaled the beginning of a new presidential administration and the end of one of the longest and most hotly contested presidential races in American history.

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Fantasy Ride: A look into the new Ciara album

Ladies and gentlemen, she is back again. Ciara Princess Harris, or just plain Ciara, is gearing us up for her long awaited third album release entitled, “Fantasy Ride” a three disc album. She’s been called the “Princess of R & B,” amongst so many other titles, and makes you wonder what will be noted as her defining work. This album just might be it. In order to know where this album will take you, you have to know from where she has brought you.

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The Day the Sports World Stood Still

As America sworn in its 44th president, Barack Hussein Obama, one could not help but sit back and be fascinated by the coverage of his inauguration, especially on sports channels such as ESPN and ESPN2. So with a mind filled with child-like curiosity, I looked into what exactly the sports world did on Inauguration Day and how they felt about it.

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Spiritual Growth from Giving

We have all recently experienced the holiday season. Hopefully it was a time of great giving and sharing. Believe it or not, the principle of giving is actually essential to growing in the Christian life. However, it is not just about giving; it is also about how one gives. Some people give so the spotlight can be on them when they want it to be. It’s not about them; but rather, the holidays are about helping others without expecting anything in return. That means unselfishly giving time and effort to support a good cause. Personally, my main focus is on pleasing the Almighty God that I serve.

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The Battle between Relaxed and Natural Hair

Chemically treated hair, which can lead to breakage and other forms of damage, is one of the reasons why women are embracing their natural textures. Some are chopping it off, while others are hesitating with the decision to go natural. With the fear of short hair, some are slowly trimming off the relaxed hair little by little. Scalp burns and balding edges are some of the other reasons why the numbers of clients who chemically relax their hair are slowly decreasing.

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“Until justice rolls down like water”

Each year, the African American Cultural Center holds a special commemoration in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. around his January 15 birthday. This year’s program took place last Wednesday at noon in Talley Student Center’s Stewart Theater with keynote speaker, lawyer and activist, Morris Dees. Founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), Dees defended many victims of hate groups, and worked endlessly to fight against hate groups and the crimes that they commit. Some of Dees’ most notable work has been attempting to disenfranchise the Ku Klux Klan, a domestic terrorist organization that has wreaked havoc across this nation.

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Economy blurs vision for college grads

People across America have felt the rift of the current economic market conditions that continue to haunt students, alumni, and graduating college students heavily. Some encourage the notion of furthering their education even more, weighing the options of successful college graduates matriculating into a slow, and devastating workforce or re-applying to a university of higher learning to complete a master’s or taking post baccalaureate courses in preparation for a master’s degree. Recently alumni, within the past year of graduation, have had to endure the setbacks, job rejections, and budget cuts. May 2009 graduates, have a bigger dilemma on their hands. They wonder what’s next: more school or tougher times.

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