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  • Oct 13 2014

    Photo Spotlight: Wake youth March in protest of ‘School-to-prison pipeline’

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    Student demonstrators marched from Raleigh’s Washington Elementary School to Central Prison on Friday to illustrate what organizers call the “school-to-prison pipeline.”
    Students of color in area schools are suspended at higher rates than other students, according to the organizers of the march NC HEAT, Youth Organizing Institute and the Education Justice Alliance. Friday was the group’s third annual march to raise awareness.
    Editor-in-Chief Chris Hart-Williams wrote Wake County School System’s School-to-Prison Pipeline in March which details suspension statistics of  Wake County Public School System students.
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    Sep 24 2014

    “Dear White People”: Nationally Anticipated Movie examines racism from the setting of an American PWI

    JESSICA STUBBS | Correspondent

    Dear white people, please stop touching my hair. Does this look like a petting zoo to you?” Is one of the many hilariously biting lines from this fall’s newest releases, “Dear White People.”

    A Winner of the 2014 Sundance Film Festival’s Special Jury Award for Breakthrough Talent, Dear White People is a sly, provocative satire of race relations in the age of Obama.

    Directed by Justin Simien, Dear White People is set for release in mid-October with much anticipation. a_560x0

    The New York Times’ A.O. Scott wrote, “Seeming to draw equal measures of inspiration from Whit Stillman and Spike Lee, but with his own tart, elegant sensibility very much in control, Mr. Simien evokes familiar campus stereotypes only to smash them and rearrange the pieces.”

    Surprisingly through all of its best promotional efforts, the film is missing what seems to be their target audience: African-American college students attending Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs).

    After seeing a trailer for the movie, some were both in shock, because they’ve never seen the trailer, and awe, because of their anticipation for a movie that is relevant to one of many cultural issues on campus here at NC State.

    Khadija Lawrence, a junior, laughed through the whole trailer. Reffering to her and a friend she said, “We are definitely seeing this movie…when does it come out?”

    Like several students around campus, of all ethnicities/races, they are anticipating the release of a movie that examines existing racism.

    College students today are not the same as college students of the 50s and 60s.

    We have different issues to struggle with in our everyday life, but who knew that racism would still be one of them?

    Though the ugly monster doesn’t rear its head as boldly as it did decades ago, it is still ever present wearing different masks to stay hidden.

    “Dear White People” covers all aspects of being black at a PWI, like assimilation, black tradition, being an “oreo” (being physically black, but socially white), and many others. Dear White People hits theatres October 17, 2014. Visit our website to view the trailer.

  • Flickr_-_smilesea_-_Beyoncé_Newcastle_2009_(20)
    Sep 24 2014

    ‘B’ Student: Rutger’s Ph.D. candidate teaches “Beyoncé” course

    TAARI COLMAN | Staff Writter

    A new course was added to the Department of Women’s and Genders Studies at Rutgers University in January of 2012.

    Instructed by Kevin Allred, a doctoral student at Rutgers, “Politicizing Beyoncé” is a class dedicated to more than just the vocalists’ very successful musical career.

    Flickr_-_smilesea_-_Beyoncé_Newcastle_2009_(20)

    Beyoncé tampil pada I Am… World Tour | Wikimedia Commons

    In an interview with Rutger’s, Allred revealed many of his thoughts and beliefs on the matter.

    The course came about after four semesters of teaching Women’s Studies 101 at Rutgers, a class in which Allred and his students often discussed Beyoncé and her relationship with being a “girl power” role model and a sexual object for patriarchal society.

    However “Politicizing Beyoncé” delves further past that issue and into others such as her control over her aesthetic and the difference between empowering and stereotypical in exposure of her body.

    Allred said, “While other artists are simply releasing music, she’s creating a grand narrative around her life, her career, and her persona.”Class discussion often opens other doors of conversation about artists such as Billie Holiday, Lady Gaga, Adele, and Amy Winehouse.

    Allred believes that an important shift must occur; rather than students simply consuming media, they should take an active part in engaging in what they are hearing and the nuanced messages that they might be overlooking.

    Allred grew up a homosexual white male in Utah and was drawn to the works of black feminist writers at a young age because he felt that racism, homophobia, sexism, and classism were all oppressive structures under which most people live.

    Allred felt connected to the black feminist writers because their experiences hit home with the ones he had himself. According to the Rutgers Interview, Beyoncé’s second studio album, B’day, is what inspired Allred to connect his love of music with his interests in politics and social regimes.

    Yet, Rutgers University is not the only university interested in classes that seem driven by Pop-Culture icons.

    At Georgetown University, the Department of Sociology has a course entitled, “Sociology of Hip Hop: Urban Theodicy Jay-Z” and the University of South Carolina has the, “Lady Gaga and the Sociology of Fame” course.

    Universities seem to be moving into an era of being more comfortable with using modern, physical examples instead of relying on students’ ability to comprehend a world before they were operating members of the society being described.

    At N.C. State, the pop-culture course selections are generic and include titles such as “Black Popular Culture” and “Modern Chinese Popular Culture.”

    Allred says, “When students don’t respond to theory or dense readings, it’s often easier to see things play out in the world around them.”

        !!!!!!!!A new course was added to the Department of Women’s and Genders Studies at Rutgers University in January of 2012.

    Instructed by Kevin Allred, a doctoral student at Rutgers, “Politicizing Beyoncé” is a class dedicated to more than just the vocalists’ very successful musical career.

    In an interview with Rutger’s, Allred revealed many of his thoughts and beliefs on the matter.

    The course came about after four semesters of teaching Women’s Studies 101 at Rutgers, a class in which Allred and his students often discussed Beyoncé and her relationship with being a “girl power” role model and a sexual object for patriarchal society.

    However “Politicizing Beyoncé” delves further past that issue and into others such as her control over her aesthetic and the difference between empowering and stereotypical in exposure of her body.

    Allred said, “While other artists are simply releasing music, she’s creating a grand narrative around her life, her career, and her persona.”Class discussion often opens other doors of conversation about artists such as Billie Holiday, Lady Gaga, Adele, and Amy Winehouse.

    Screen Shot 2014-09-24 at 12.44.03 PM

    Allred believes that an important shift must occur; rather than students simply consuming media, they should take an active part in engaging in what they are hearing and the nuanced messages that they might be overlooking.

    Allred grew up a homosexual white male in Utah and was drawn to the works of black feminist writers at a young age because he felt that racism, homophobia, sexism, and classism were all oppressive structures under which most people live.

    Allred felt connected to the black feminist writers because their experiences hit home with the ones he had himself. According to the Rutgers Interview, Beyoncé’s second studio album, B’day, is what inspired Allred to connect his love of music with his interests in politics and social regimes.

    Yet, Rutgers University is not the only university interested in classes that seem driven by Pop-Culture icons.

    At Georgetown University, the Department of Sociology has a course entitled, “Sociology of Hip Hop: Urban Theodicy Jay-Z” and the University of South Carolina has the, “Lady Gaga and the Sociology of Fame” course.

    Universities seem to be moving into an era of being more comfortable with using modern, physical examples instead of relying on students’ ability to comprehend a world before they were operating members of the society being described.

    At N.C. State, the pop-culture course selections are generic and include titles such as “Black Popular Culture” and “Modern Chinese Popular Culture.”

    Allred says, “When students don’t respond to theory or dense readings, it’s often easier to

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