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  • Natalie Sherwood, a junior majoring in polymer and color chemistry, recites her spoken word piece at the Technicmetric Poetry Slam in Talley Student Union on Thursday, Jan 21st.  Sherwoods piece, which won her the grand prize for the competition, an Apple Watch, highlighted the struggles that people of color face in our society today.  The purpose of the Slam was to "combine technical intelligence with creative genius," and give NC State students a chance to showcase their talents behind the mike.
    Jan 27 2016

    When technical intelligence meets creative genius

    QuiAnne’ Holmes | Staff Writer

    Last Thursday, Jan. 21, there was no place you would rather have been than the Technimetric Poetry Slam.

    This event was created by the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) and sponsored by Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) media, Arts NC State, and My Health Impact.

    As students filled the room, the dim lights created a quaint, intimate space with refreshments, music, and an art gallery consisting of student paintings. Darryl Johnson, a junior in Mechanical Engineering and the President of NSBE opened the event up by introducing the purpose of the event: “technical intellect with creative genius.”

    He then shared his own poetry which included gut wrenching verses that transformed engineering concepts into challenges concerning the unjust circumstances that African Americans face in today’s society.

    This set the tone for tonight and continued to manifest itself in the spoken word of all of the contestants.

    The EMCee of the night was Nehemiah J. Mabry, a Ph.D student. He set the ground rules to create a supportive safe space for the participants. These rules included snapping for and verbalizing appreciation during a performance and continuing that vibe by applauding their exit.

    After the house rules were set, Nehemiah introduced the the judges, Angelitha L. Daniel, Alexis Carson, Kryston Gollihue, and Will McInery. These judges had the tough task of picking the first place winner who would receive an Apple Watch as well as the runner up who would receive LED speakers. The crowd favorite would be chosen by the audience using Twitter retweets to support their favorite performer.

    The first poet to grace the stage was Natalie Sherwood, a junior majoring in polymer and color chemistry. She blew the audience away creating rhymes that touched on black lives lost such as Michael Brown, Freddie Gray and Tamir Rice.

    The creativity continued with a freestyle spoken word from Taha Arif, a junior in electrical engineering who grabbed the crowd’s heart, tickled their funny bones, and even shocked himself with his own personal realizations.

    In between poets, there was an Art Gallery give away in which audience members were randomly selected after using a QPR code provided by NSBE to win student paintings.

    Next up, Tierra Knight, a junior in chemical engineering, gave inspiring words saying that “we are all powerful beyond measure, and most importantly “who are you not to be?” Then Ade Adesina, a sophomore in communication media used his science filled poem to tell a love story.

    Morgan Sanchez, an undergraduate in engineering, let everyone know that it was her first time doing spoken word. The community embraced her with open arms as she shared a short but meaningful poem. Last but not least, Camerian Williams, a junior in psychology and social work shared his poem about how opposites attract.

    While the judges gathered their scores, Will McInery the guest judge and poet came to the stage to give his own inspirational words of encouragement as well as his own spoken word.

    He first acknowledged the need for more spaces of creativity like the Poetry Slam that allows students to express themselves.

    Finally, it was time to announce the awards. Runner up was Taha Arif, crowd favorite was Camerian Williams and first place winner was Natalie Sherwood.

  • Frank Warren, creator behind the project Post Secret, shares his ideas about secrets, and the power that can come from sharing them at Pop!Tech in 2008. Kris Krüg
    Nov 04 2015

    Secrets are the currency of intimacy

    Homecoming speaker shares the power of secrets

    Zoe Wilson   Correspondent

    To kick off the start of Homecoming week, NC State hosted the creator of PostSecret Frank Warren, who is now known as the most trusted stranger in the world.

    Warren spoke to a large crowd about his experiences that led him to create the successful PostSecret network. Ten years ago Warren thought of a crazy idea and decided to hand out thousands of blank postcards to strangers all over Washington DC, and encouraged them to send an anonymous secret to his home address. His goal was to get 365 postcards, one for every day of the year. Today his total count of secrets he has received to his home surpasses 700 million.

    “It didn’t take long before my crazy idea didn’t seem so crazy,” said Warren. When he first created PostSecret, he did not know what kind of path it would take until he received one postcard in particular, that gave him an epiphany of how he could uses all of these secrets to help people.

    One side of this specific post card had a picture of a door with a hole in it. On the other side it read, “The holes are from when my mom tried knocking down my door so she could continue beating me.” The day he uploaded this on his website it got one million views and others started sharing similar secrets, and although this did not solve their abusive secrets, it gave them an outlet to make their burden seem lighter so they could feel a little bit better.

    Warren could personally relate with this postcard and admitted that he too had a similar door in his childhood experiences. He also shared some of the hardships he has endured in his life such as losing a friend and family member to suicide, being homeless, having mental illnesses and having to get help for his depression. He was very thankful that he was able to find help when he needed it, and decided to guide his website towards helping others who are struggling with their secrets.

    Since the creation of PostSecret, Frank has been able to donate over one million dollars to suicide prevention hotlines. “Children almost broken by the world are most likely to change it,” said Warren. “If you can find your way through the darkness to light, and I believe you can, whether it is through medication, religion, therapy, a friend, music, or art, on the other side you will be transformed. You’ll have this beautiful story of healing, a story you can use to help others.”

    Warren spoke of psychological research done on secrets that found those carrying a secret about being homosexual or having affairs in their marriage are more likely to get sick. Warren encouraged his audience to let go of their secrets because it leads you “closer to the person you’re supposed to be, doing the work only you can do.”

    Graecie Vrchota, a senior majoring in social work, told Warren after his speech, “When my brother came out to our mom, she bought him your PostSecret book as a way for him to feel better about his secret.”

    The PostSecret project was created by Warren in 2005, today people continue to mail their secrets anonymously on homemade postcards. Selected secrets are posted on the PostSecret website postsecret.com.

  • Sep 23 2015

    How to get away with excellence

    Jillian Smith | Staff Writer

    On September 20, history was made as Viola Davis became the first African-American woman to take home an Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series.

    Davis won for her role in “How to Get Away With Murder,” an ABC drama in which she plays Annalise Keating, a brilliant criminal defense lawyer and professor.

    This was a major stride for African-American women, considering that the only other black woman to receive an Emmy for leading actress was Isabel Sanford in 1981. She won for her role in the comedy series “The Jeffersons.”

    While many more doors have been opened for black women in film, television has been a different battle considering the lack of leading roles available.

    “The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity,” Davis said during her speech. “You cannot win an Emmy for roles that are simply not there. So, here’s to all the writers, the awesome people…People who have redefined what it means to be beautiful, to be sexy, to be a leading woman, to be black.”

    To you Viola, we say congratulations, and thank you. Thank you for breaking down one more barrier and opening one more door, allowing a new light to shine on our culture.

     

  • Synthia SAINT JAMES
    Sep 23 2015

    Artist Synthia Saint James exhibit opens in the AACC’s gallery

    Chris Hart-Williams | Editor-in-Chief  

    In the the art gallery of the African American Cultural Center, AACC now holds the artwork of international award winning multicultural visual artist Synthia Saint James. The center partnered with the Women’s Center, the College of Design, University Housing and Arts NC State to host Saint James and her art. The exhibit entitled The Creative World of Synthia SAINT JAMES opened on September 15, 2015.

    One of Saint James most known pieces is featured on the cover of the award winning book “Waiting to Exhale,” a New York Times bestseller by Terry McMillan published in 1992. She credits that commision for introducing her work for making her known internationally.

    “When we got the book we were struck by the beauty of the cover and we were so excited, we  wanted to know where this artwork came from ” said AACC interim director Frances Graham when she spoke at the new exhibit’s opening about her and friends admiration of the cover’s illustration when they got their copies of the book. “It has been such a pleasure to have Dr. Saint James on our campus this week we love the work that she does and the inspiration that she brings.”

    Saint James is the designer of the first US postal stamp for the Kwanzaa holiday and her artistry is featured at the 2’8 foot by 150 foot ceramic tile design for the Ontario, CA International Airport , her paintings are on the covers of over 70 books.

    The self taught artist she credits her African- American, Native-American, Haitian, Jewish and German ancestry for her talent.

    “I’ve been wanting to come here for about five years.” I started sending things her and finally it got to the right people”

    Music dance, nature, countries of the world and books she reads are some of what inspires Saint James.

    “Then other times it would be something I really would like to know about, but I don’t know anything about,” said Saint James. “I do a lot of research and from that comes the inspiration.”

    In the last thirteen years Saint James said she’s developed a strong ritual at home, the beach is one of the places she likes to take walks before painting.

    “I can’t do it everywhere,” said Saint James who currently resides in Los Angeles, California.

    “I get up extremely early so that I can do the little business of art. and do all of the computer work…then I drive, listen to music, whatever I’m feeling at the time and get to the beach before dawn,” Saint James said. “I get there Just before dawn  sunrise and when I get to the beach I walk on the sand closest to the water where on many days I see the dolphins, seals and all kinds of birds…it’s the beginning of their morning but the most radiant thing is seeing the sun rise and.”

    After her 45 minute drive and walk she does her affirmations and prayers and she gets what she refers to as “tunnel vision” about what she can get done that day. She also mediates for inspiration and to decided what to title a piece.

    Saint James is no stranger to Raleigh in May of 2010 she received her first Honorary Doctorate Degree in Humane Letters from Saint Augustine’s University on Oakwood Ave. She would connect with the school again in the Fall of 2012 to open the Synthia Saint James Fine Art Institute at Saint Augustine’s University.

    Saint James’ exhibit will remain on display until December 4, the center’s art gallery is located on the second floor of Witherspoon Student Center.

    One of Saint James most known pieces is featured on the cover of the award winning book “Waiting to Exhale,” a New York Times bestseller by Terry McMillan published in 1992. She credits that commission for introducing her work for making her known internationally.

    “When we got the book we were struck by the beauty of the cover and we were so excited, we  wanted to know where this artwork came from ” said AACC interim director Frances Graham when she spoke at the new exhibit’s opening about her and friends admiration of the cover’s illustration when they got their copies of the book. “It has been such a pleasure to have Dr. Saint James on our campus this week we love the work that she does and the inspiration that she brings.”

    Saint James is the designer of the first US postal stamp for the Kwanzaa holiday and her artistry is featured at the 2’8 foot by 150 foot ceramic tile design for the Ontario, CA International Airport , her paintings are on the covers of over 70 books.

    The self taught artist she credits her African- American, Native-American, Haitian, Jewish and German ancestry for her talent.

    “I’ve been wanting to come here for about five years.” I started sending things her and finally it got to the right people”

    Music dance, nature, countries of the world and books she reads are some of what inspires Saint James.

    “Then other times it would be something I really would like to know about, but I don’t know anything about,” said Saint James. “I do a lot of research and from that comes the inspiration.”

    In the last thirteen years Saint James said she’s developed a strong ritual at home, the beach is one of the places she likes to take walks before painting.

    “I can’t do it everywhere,” said Saint James who currently resides in Los Angeles, California.

    “I get up extremely early so that I can do the little business of art. and do all of the computer work…then I drive, listen to music, whatever I’m feeling at the time and get to the beach before dawn,” Saint James said. “I get there Just before dawn  sunrise and when I get to the beach I walk on the sand closest to the water where on many days I see the dolphins, seals and all kinds of birds…it’s the beginning of their morning but the most radiant thing is seeing the sun rise and.”

    After her 45 minute drive and walk she does her affirmations and prayers and she gets what she refers to as “tunnel vision” about what she can get done that day. She also mediates for inspiration and to decided what to title a piece.

    Saint James is no stranger to Raleigh in May of 2010 she received her first Honorary Doctorate Degree in Humane Letters from Saint Augustine’s University on Oakwood Ave. She would connect with the school again in the Fall of 2012 to open the Synthia Saint James Fine Art Institute at Saint Augustine’s University.

    Saint James’ exhibit will remain on display until December 4, the center’s art gallery is located on the second floor of Witherspoon Student Center.

     

     

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